Back to top

Churn baby churn!

"Churn" is a bit of jargon that companies use to describe the loss of customers in a given period, usually in a month. You'll hear it in press releases, analyst reports, and sales material from CRM vendors like "we brought our churn way down by using XYZ customer pleaser tool and our stock has been doing great ever since!"



I had heard about churn before, but never really dealt with it. For work I had to take a tool I was developing and replace an "expected customer lifetime in months" input for a "churn" input because "churn" is easier for our people to think about. That's fine, but what does "churn" mean when I'm calculating something over the life of a customer? My models needed a number of months.

Category: 
People Involved: 

Removing Problems

I like to call myself a "problem remover" but what that really means is that I fight tiny little battles on a daily basis against stupid behavior of other people. I pick up other people's trash and if I see someone drop trash I confront them. If a car is not paying attention to me as a biker or pedestrian I yell at them. If I get a telemarketer call, I will play the "how long can I keep you on the line game". I ask questions about their product, start asking for upgraded options, make like I'm interested and then end it with: "Well, my wife makes all the business decisions and she's not home, so bye!"

Category: 
People Involved: 

Best Office/Productivity/Diagramming Software

Version to use: I use the 2.0 version

Yes, it's true. OpenOffice.org is my favorite "productivity" software. I use it practically every day.

You may say, that's nice, but where are the templates and the "text to columns".

Well, poke around for a little while on OpenOffice.orgDocs and you should be able to find any feature that's missing.

Category: 
People Involved: 

What's Up with your last name

Ok. So we got married in 2002 and we didn't want to have two different last names, we didn't want to hyphenate, and nobody really liked the idea of us choosing one of our birth last names. So, we combined the last names which seemed to be slightly more popular, if only for the novelty.

We used to be Greg Kneser and Nicole (Nikki) Addison but are now the Knaddisons.

People occasionally ask us "how do you pronounce your last name?" While we are very particular about the pronunciation, the real answer is - who knows?

Generally we pronounce the K and the N with emphasis on the second syllable.

People Involved: 

Pages

Subscribe to Knaddison.com RSS