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Greg

Greggles, Gregorybeans, Frijoles, Beans

Drupal is the largest open source project ever - the evolution of marketing exagerations

In an article about Drupal's security process my colleague Jam made the claim that Drupal was the "the world's largest open source CMS." I was dubious at first, but his claim has some merit. The first paragraph of his article links to a study by Henrik Ingo of openlife.cc.

The study compared the projects on metrics like:

  • developers active /day
  • commits/day
  • loc/day
  • developers active / month
  • developers active all time
  • companies all time

Using those metrics Henrik declared Drupal to be one the largest "CMS" project and one of the largest open source projects (approximately 6th overall). However, there are some weaknesses in the study. The study has incomplete data about Drupal (missing devs/day, locs/day, companies all time) and probably incomplete/innacurate data on the other projects. The study was limited to a subset of total projects and only 2 CMS. In comparing the CMS, it considers Wordpress core only but seems to be looking at all Drupal contributed modules when calculating commits/day (or it sampled a very active day for Drupal core!).

If Henrik is interested I would be very willing to get him the data he needs from Drupal to do a more accurate comparison of CMS projects. To be clear: I think Henrik's analysis is very interesting and useful but could be improved to be more accurate.

Bold claim heads towards a lie: Standing Cloud's Drupal Press Release

Standing Cloud wrote a press release which was printed verbatim by other "news" sources like sfgate.

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Initial Thoughts on the Kindle Fire

So, a few weeks back my Kindle Fire arrived and I started jotting notes as I opened it and used it. Here's the collection:

  • The un-boxing was surprisingly pleasant: minimal plastic, lots of recycled elements, no user-manual (it's on the device!). The package was about 2.5 inches tall and about 2 inches of that was empty, with a small cardboard elevating the kindle above the empty space that contained a small USB cord.. Why ruin the experience with all that empty space?
  • The USB Cord...it's a "wallwart" with a micro-usb on the end. I'm super excited that the device uses the current standard micro-usb b as its source of power and connectivity but what a waste to send me a cable connected to a wall-wart. I'd be way happier with something like this wall-usb and standard usb cable.
  • I now have learned that this wallwart USB outputs more than normal power, so it can't be a normal device. That kinda...sucks. If it uses different power I would almost rather have a different plug just to make that clear (though apparently the size lets me power it up slowly via computer if I'm in a bind). I wish it would take normal micro-usb power form a normal cable even if that means slower charging.
  • The power button is on the bottom right next to the USB port and headphone port which makes it easy to accidentally press it when you connect/disconnect your headphones/usb plug. To solve this, I've started using it upside down which means I type my password upside down when I unlock it. Of course the screen flips once it's unlocked, but now the sound comes out the "bottom" and gets my stomach messy with it's messy, messy sound.
  • The screen is pretty awesome. Very bright and crisp.
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Android Apps I actually Use

I recently had to reset my entire phone deleting all contents (different story). In the process I wrote down the old apps I had that I liked so I could reinstall them after wiping it. I was surprised how easy it was to do that and how all my contacts/mail/calendar being associated with my Google account made the whole process simple.

So, in case you're interested, here's the list of apps I actually reinstalled:

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Selling something for free on craigslist - for economists

I recently gave away an ugly backyard shed for free on CraigsList provided the person came to pick it up. Within minutes of posting the item I got 7 emails. I deleted the post immediately. I responded to the person who seemed best able to take it (she had a tiltable trailer with a winch on it) and set it up for Saturday. She failed to show saturday, so scheduled Monday. She failed to show Monday, but came Tuesday. I wasn't too worried about which day she came but did want it gone.

The 9.5 foot wide shed was at the end of a 20 foot long concrete pad that was 10 feet wide with a tree on one side and my garage on the other side. At the end of the pad was my alley. So she had to thread the shed down the pad between the tree and the garage without hitting anything, turn the corner at the end of the pad so it could be loaded onto her 20 foot long trailer. The winch on her trailer was broken. It took my battery charger, several screws and boards I had handy, and a few hours of my time to get the thing loaded on her trailer. Her truck hit my neighbor's fence and left tracks in the alley. I am not happy about that.

Structuring better "free" sales for Craigs List

If you are giving something away for "free" as long as they pick it up, I suggest you keep the listed price at zero and keep the title as "Free" but then in the details and in your communication with the person strike a slightly different deal: they pre-pay you $100 for the privilege of taking it for free which you decide whether to keep or give back. If their removal of the item meets your standards then you promise to give back the $100. If they ruin something or break something or - worst - abandon the pickup you keep the $100 to help pay for whatever the problem is.

My theory is that this will reduce the demand to only serious people who will show up on time, with the right tools/equipment to get the item.

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How to write an email to piss off your developer

I'm writing this so other developers can share in the laughter (ha!) and designers/managers can learn.

I've seen this a few times. It feels like there's a mad-libs form that designers/managers use to communicate things in a software project.

Hey:

$normal_behavior_of_our_product_for_the_past_year, $insulting_phrase, $client_need_never_mentioned_before_this_month, $high_stress!!!!!

Thanks,
$designer_or_manager

So, an example letter:

Hey:

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